Gen. Maryanne Miller On How To Leverage Your Weaknesses

Chief Executive Officer

In the history of the United States Air Force, 225 people have achieved the rank of four-star general, only five of them women. Recently retired General Maryanne Miller may have the most fascinating story of them all.

In the fall of 2001, Miller had submitted her retirement paperwork when she watched in horror as terrorists flew planes into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Without hesitation, then Lieutenant Colonel Miller, made a life-altering choice.

“It was a Tuesday. I remember just standing there getting ready and watching the airplane go into the first tower,” Miller recalled, “That Friday, I called the Air Force Reserve Command and said pull my retirement paperwork, I’m staying. Duty is not done.” She served 19 more years and rose to become, at the time, the highest-ranking woman in the United States military.

Growing up in Hilliard, Ohio, Miller spent many nights as a young girl playing baseball in the backyard. “Every family has that one thing that gathers them,” she said, “Sports became that for all six of us in the house.” Her fun family tradition led to a softball scholarship at Ohio State University, an experience that taught her valuable lessons in grit and perseverance.

In this candid conversation with one of America’s great leaders, you will learn how to leverage your weaknesses properly, and we will reveal the biggest mistake people make as they seek to climb the ranks.

YOU WILL LEARN:

11:15  How Title IX impacted Maryanne and her sister, Peg.

17:00  How to practice and review “game film” in business.

28:00  The biggest mistake people make as they try to climb the ranks.

30:00  They key to successful hiring and managing.

31:00  How to properly leverage your weaknesses.

34:45  The importance of answering the call of duty.

Check out the full Corporate Competitor Podcast interview archive and subscribe to new episodes.

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